Construction starting on for sale townhome project in the Marmalade

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Rendering of five-condo unit building in the proposed Marmalade Courtyards project. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.
The site plan for the Marmalade Courtyards. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.
The site plan for the Marmalade Courtyards. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.

Salt Lake City’s current construction wave seems to have been dominated by large multifamily developments, but since 2015 the city is also experiencing a rise in “missing middle” projects that are underway in many of the cities evolving neighborhoods.

In the Marmalade neighborhood, preliminary construction work has started on the Marmalade Court, a large missing middle project near the intersection of Reed Avenue and 300 West.  The project by nonprofit community developer, Neighborworks Salt Lake City, will add 30 mid-density, for sale residential units between 800 North and Reed Avenue off of 300 West.

The project consists of both new construction and renovations of existing buildings on 300 West.   Replacing 1.47 acres of vacant property will be 23 new construction townhomes.  The new construction townhomes will be in six buildings, two of which will front Reed Avenue with the other four fronting private streets, including a mid-block street that will connect Reed to 800 North.

The two buildings at the northeast corner of the block near the intersection of 300 West and 800 Noth will be converted into residential units.  The vacant former red bricked building at the intersection will be converted into a five-unit condo development.  The condo units will be income restricted.  The one-story commercial building directly to the south of the red bricked building will be converted into two townhomes.

The Marmalade Court development not only breaks up the block with a mid-block street but will add several new pedestrian connections and open space.  According to site plans, a sidewalk will separate the two converted buildings on 300 West to provide a pedestrian connection to the interior townhomes.   A public courtyard will separate the converted townhomes on 300 West from the Club JAM property to the south.  The courtyard will also provide a pedestrian connection from 300 West to an internal sidewalk network connecting to the new construction townhomes.  The project will also include landscaped play area directly west of the courtyard.

The project will include off street parking at a 1:1 ratio for the units fronting 300 West and a two parking stall per unit ratio for the new townhomes.

Lots for the new construction townhomes will be 1,100 square feet.  The rehabilitated townhomes will have a lot size of 1,600 square feet, while the condo units will be 900 square feet.

Neighborworks specializes in mixed-income residential developments.  Although the organization launched in 1977 in the East Liberty Park neighborhood, it has since focused its efforts on revitalizing neighborhood in Salt Lake’s west side.

The Marmalade Courtyard development is one of four missing middle projects coming to the neighborhood.  Construction is underway on the Almond Street Townhomes, a for sale 17-unit development on the 200 North block of Almond Street by Garbett Homes.

Just a block to the west of the Almond Street Townhomes at the intersection of 200 North and 200 West, developers plan to build an eight-unit mixed-use development that will include seven townhomes and a two-story commercial space.

The fourth missing middle project is The Grove development, a 12-unit for-sale townhome project proposed for the site directly east of the Marmalade Branch library on the 200 West block of 500 North.  Everest Builders, the project’s developers have applied for a building permit for just the first two units.

Rendering of the new townhomes in the proposed Marmalade Courtyards project. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.
Rendering of the new townhomes in the proposed Marmalade Courtyards project. Image courtesy Salt Lake City.
Rendering of the conversion of a one-story commercial building on 300 West to a two-unit residential building. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.
Rendering of the conversion of a one-story commercial building on 300 West to a two-unit residential building. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.
About Isaac Riddle 498 Articles
Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.
  • Jarod Hall

    It is great to see some for-sale product coming to Salt Lake.