Demolition work begins for large Sugar House development

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Rendering of the Sugarmont Apartments as designed by Studio PBA. Under the draft impact fee plan, the developers would pay $1.2 million. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.
Rendering of the Sugarmont Apartments on McClelland Street. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.
Rendering of the Sugarmont Apartments on McClelland Street as designed by Studio PBA. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.

After years of proposals and several different iterations, demolition is underway on the site of the future Sugarmont Apartments by Boulder Ventures, the next phase of their 2100 Sugarhouse Mixed Use Development.   The project replaces two abandoned Granite Furniture warehouses at the intersection of McClelland Street and Sugarmont Drive.

The Salt Lake City Planning Commission approved a Planned Development and Conditional Building and Site Design Review in August.  Construction of the Sugarmont Apartments should commence soon after demolition and ground work are completed.

Aerial view of the block surrounding the proposed Sugarmont Apartments. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.

The project will be eight stories with 352 units- including a mix of 34 studio apartments, 206 one-bedrooms, 93 two-bedrooms and 19 three-bedroom townhome units in two buildings on 2.86 acres that will be separated by a pedestrian walkway near the intersection of McClelland Street and Sugarmont Drive by a pedestrian bridge.

The project will feature three floors of parking wrapped by ground-floor, multi-level townhomes and five floors of residential.  The project will also include a pedestrian plaza at the southwest corner of the project.

The walkway will connect the project’s pedestrian plaza to Monument Plaza and an extension of Wilmington Avenue that will be co-managed by Boulder and Craig Mecham Management, the developer of the proposed Dixon Building directly east of the Sugarmont Apartments.

Because the walkway is another pedestrian connection from the Fairmont Station, the current terminus of the S-Line streetcar, Commission members emphasized the importance of prominent signage and placemaking.  The Commission members requested language be added to clarify signage requirements to require wayfinding signs that guide pedestrians exiting from the streetcar to the walkway and the pedestrian connection to Monument Plaza at the northeast corner of the block.

Rendering of the pedestrian passage of Sugarmont Apartments looking north from Sugarmont Drive and McClelland Street. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.
Rendering of the pedestrian passage of Sugarmont Apartments looking north from Sugarmont Drive and McClelland Street. Image courtesy Salt Lake City planning documents.

As conditions for approval, the developers must provide adequate space to accommodate the PRATT and McClelland Trails and dedicate to the Utah Transit Authority the portion along Sugarmont Drive that will be included in the S-Line expansion.  Also, as was required for the adjacent Dixon Building, the Wilmington Avenue extension must be completed before a certificate of occupancy can be issued to Boulder Ventures.

Commission members also requested that the landscaping of the plaza and the walkway be designed as to indicate a public walkway and not just a residential amenity.  The walkway will be 22 feet wide and will be open to pedestrians at all times, similar to the pedestrian walkway and plaza at the Wilmington Gardens.

The Sugarmont Apartments will be 85 feet tall, 20 feet under the maximum allowed height in the core of Sugar House Business District.  The developers originally proposed building a 10-story residential with 492 units, but after several meetings with residents the developers scaled down the project.

Boulder opened the first phase of the 2100 Sugarhouse development, on the corner of McClelland and 2100 South, in 2013 with Flatbread Neapolitan Pizzeria as its anchor.  The first phase included ground floor retail, mostly restaurants, and two floors of office space, including the offices for Boulder Ventures.

As recently as 2014, Boulder intended the second phase on the southwest corner of the block to include a ground-floor retail promenade with residential above.  The project would have added 40,000 square feet of retail with 288 residential units on the top five floors.  The developers removed plans for additional retail at the Sugarmont, citing consistent tenant turnover in its property on McClelland.

*This is an updated version of an previous post.

Demolition of the former Granite Furniture warehouses at the intersection of McClelland Street and Sugarmont Drive. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Demolition of the former Granite Furniture warehouses at the intersection of McClelland Street and Sugarmont Drive. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Demolition of the former Granite Furniture warehouses as seen from the intersection of Highland Drive and Wilmington Avenue. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Demolition of the former Granite Furniture warehouses as seen from the intersection of Highland Drive and Wilmington Avenue. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

 

A 2014 rendering of the Sugarmont development as designed by GSBS Architects.
A 2014 rendering of the prior proposal for the Sugarmont development as designed by GSBS Architects.
About Isaac Riddle 553 Articles
Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.
  • Scott Sloan

    Excited to see this approved, but too bad they didn’t allow more height. The developers are right; there is a lot of retail in the area (fed by light rail) but for some reason the need for density seems to escape the masses.

  • Soren Simonsen

    Pleased with the continued improvements in Sugar House developments. I applaud the developer and designers for this project. I’m particularly interested in seeing this become a stellar example of street level residential. Not all streets are appropriate for retail. Let the retail streets like 2100 South and Highland Drive remain retail. It’s OK to have some streets that are more urban residential in character and use.

  • I would be nice to see a least one pad for retail though. With all the residents living there, it seems it’d be easy to support a small cafe or something of the sort.