Net-zero community coming to Salt Lake

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Rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
Aerial rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
Aerial rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective.  Each home will have south-facing solar panels.  Image courtesy Redfish Builders.

The Central City/Liberty Wells neighborhood will soon have an environmentally friendly infill development. On Wednesday the Salt Lake City Planning Commission unanimously approved a planned development application by developers, Redfish Builders.  The developers planned to build the Zenith 1 Planned Development on the 1100 South block of 400 East.  The project will be built on two parcels and consist of five, for sale net-zero homes.

“These five homes will generate as much renewable energy as they consume over the course of a year,” said Tiffany Spence of Redfish Builders.  “Redfish is committed to raising the bar on urban infill by better building and green development.”

Spence told the Commission that while there are net-zero experiments in the city, the Zenith development would be the first net zero community in the state.  Spence added that if the project is approved, Salt Lake would join Denver and Portland as the only cities in America with net-zero communities.

The project is the second recent residential community development.  Redfish also developed the Arlington Park townhomes, now referred to as Creek View, on the 1000 east block of 800 South.  Construction of that project finished last year on the project that consists of six, three-story townhomes.

Two single family homes currently occupy the parcels.  Those homes will be demolished to make way for new construction.  Each home will have its own lot but will share a private driveway.  The homes will be two stories and have 2500 square feet of living space with an attached one-car garage.  All but one of the homes will have a second parking spot in the adjacent side yard to each home.

The Commission also approved rear yard setbacks for the homes that the developers argued was necessary so that the homes could be strategically placed to maximize south and west facing sun exposure.  Solar awnings will exceed allowed side yard encroachment by two feet.

Planning staff recommended as a condition that developers include a walkway that connects each home to 400 East.

Residents seem to generally be in favor of the project.  The four residents that spoke to the Commission on the project each expressed support for the project and its energy efficient elements and open format. According to planning staff the city only received one comment against the proposal.

“I fully support this project… I think we should promote eco friendly homes as much as we can,” said a resident that lives directly adjacent to the project site.

Rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
Rendering of the Zenith 1 development as seen from 400 East.  The project was designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
Rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
Rendering of the Zenith 1 development as designed by Colony Design Collective. Image courtesy Redfish Builders.
About Isaac Riddle 592 Articles
Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.