New apartments coming to west-side development node

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The 700 South Apartments at the intersection of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The 700 South Apartments at the intersection of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The 700 South Apartments at the intersection of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

The future of the Salt Lake’s west-side will be located in key nodes or intersections that will be a catalyst for development, according to the city planners behind the proposed West Salt Lake Master Plan.   Under the master plan, most of the designated nodes are located along 900 West and Redwood Road, the two main north-south arteries in the neighborhood.

Nodes have been identified as key corridors to spur development.
Nodes have been identified as key corridors to spur development.

The intersection of 700 South and 900 West is one of these nodes and appears poised to be one of the first to see the effects of focused new development.  Construction will soon be completed on the 700 South, or Mansell Apartments,  a 16-unit multifamily development on the southwest corner of the intersection.

There is space on the lot for future development.  Adjacent to the lot is an large abandoned house that could also become a higher density residential project.

A central goal of the West Salt Lake Master Plan is to better connect the city’s west-side to downtown and the rest of the city.  The west-side and the city core are separated by Interstate 15 and a busy rail corridor.  Most of the designated nodes along 900 West and Redwood Road are located on key east-west streets that connect to the rest of the city.

These streets: 400, 800, 900, 1300 and 1700 South are the only east-west streets that provide direct access to and from the Glendale and Poplar Grove neighborhoods.  Of those streets, just 400 South circumvents the heavily used rail tracks.

There is an opportunity for growth at the 700 South and 900 West intersection.  The new apartment building is built right off the sidewalk creating density to the area.

Across the street on the southeast corner is a restaurant and other retail.  Like the 700 South Apartments, the retail small strip engages the street-level with zero setbacks (built right up to the sidewalk).

The northwest corner of this intersection is the corner most ripe for new development.  A pawn shop in what was formally a residential home currently occupies this corner.  Adjacent to the shop is a vacant lot.   A senior-citizen residential center occupies the north-east corner.

The 700 South, 900 West intersection stands to be a catalyst for others parts of the city’s west-side.  The 700 South Apartments are two blocks from the 9 Line trail, a bike and pedestrian trail built along an old rail corridor running parallel to 900 South, that will soon see improvements east of 900 West.

700 South Apartments as seen from the north-west corner at 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
700 South Apartments as seen from the northwest corner at 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Retail at the south-east corner of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Retail at the southeast corner of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Retail on the corner of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Retail on the corner of 700 South and 900 West. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Abandoned house directly south of the 700 South Apartments. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The abandoned house directly south of the 700 South Apartments. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

*Correction: a previous version of this article listed the intersection of 700 South and 900 West as being part of the Glendale neighborhood though it is actually in the Poplar Grove neighborhood.

About Isaac Riddle 592 Articles
Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.
  • Brad Bartholomew

    I can’t believe no one commented on how horrible these apartments look. I’d rather not have anything built if this is what they’re building.

  • Jordan T

    Why can’t the Salt Lake Valley have apartments, condos that look halfway decent, like what you would find in Austin, Portland, or Seattle? All of the places I’ve seen are really dull and boring.

  • leslie

    Seriously could this building be any uglier? Who designed this? And then who approved it?