Townhome project under construction in Central Ninth

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The north row of the Prana Townhomes. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The north row of the Prana Townhomes are framed up to the second floor. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The north row of the Prana Townhomes are framed up to the second floor. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

The team behind the Blue Koi Apartments, a 21-unit development at the intersection of 900 East and 1700 South in Sugar House, are developing a similarly sized project in Central Ninth.  Construction is underway on the Prana Townhomes, a 21-unit townhome project, at the intersection of 800 South and Washington Street.

The project includes three rows of townhomes.  There will be nine homes along first row facing 800 South.  Each unit will be three stories with on street parking.  There will be six townhomes along both the second and third rows.  Those townhomes will also be three stories, but each will include a ground-level garage.

Lotus Equities is the developer and Tuttle and Associates is the architectural firm of the townhome project.  Lotus Equities does not have an active website.  SL City News was unable to obtain renderings after several attempts to reach out to the developer and architect.

Lotus Equities is the developer of the Lotus Apartments on the 300 East block of South Temple, another collaboration with Tuttle and Associates.

Tuttle and Associates has designed several recent residential projects in the City including: the 360 Apartments just west of Pioneer Park, the Seasons at Library Square at the intersection of 300 East and 500 South and the Newhouse Apartments at the 500 East block of 500 South.

It is difficult to surmise how the Prana townhomes will look when completed since the architect’s past projects vary in design.

The developer would not confirm if the project will be owner-occupied units or rentals.  The Blue Koi Apartments (although designed as more townhome than apartment) are rentals.

The site was previously the location of Moench Printing & Mailing, before the Moench family sold the parcel to Lotus Equities.  The developer previously planned to build a 52-unit apartment project called Box Lofts at the site.  The apartment project was planned to be four stories built over a parking structure with 27 parking stalls.  That project’s application to City planners was voided earlier this year.

Most of the recently completed and planned developments in Central Ninth have been large multi-family projects.  The Prana Townhome project reflects what planners call the missing middle, the smaller-scale residential projects that bridge the gap between detached single-family homes and large multi-family developments.

According to the 2010 Census, downtown Salt Lake City (including the Granary and Central Ninth neighborhoods) has an average housing density of three residential units per acre.  In comparison, downtowns in Denver and Portland average eight and 14 units per acre respectively.

Twenty-one townhomes on a 0.45 acre site, will bring needed density to the Central Ninth neighborhood. With three bedrooms in each unit, the project could attract more families to the neighborhood.  Central Ninth falls within the Downtown Community Plan area.  One component of that plan is to increase the downtown residential population to 20,000 by 2040.  The plan also calls for more choice in housing types, including townhomes and duplexes, that still add density, yet make downtown living more accessible to couples with children.

The foundation has been poured for the two south rows of townhomes. Each unit will have a ground-floor garage. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The foundation has been poured for the two south rows of townhomes. Each unit will have a ground-floor garage. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The Prana Townhomes as seen from Washington Street. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The Prana Townhomes as seen from Washington Street. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The north row of townhomes as seen from 800 South. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The north row of townhomes as seen from 800 South. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
About Isaac Riddle 568 Articles
Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.
  • Jacob Max Morrill

    This is great news for this area. I would like to see some more units that stay true to this area’s roots by providing joint retail/workshop/and residential space. That’s what will help create that village atmosphere we want so much.