City seeks input on proposed homeless resource centers

Rendering of the proposed High Avenue Homeless Resource Center. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.

Salt Lake City officials have selected the sites and populations for two proposed homeless resource centers and now want to hear from the public on the centers’ design and programming.  This week the city will hold two public meetings at the proposed site’s for the centers to gather input from residents and stakeholders.

Both proposed centers will be smaller at two-stories each and with a cap of 200 beds.  The city envisions providing multiple services onsite at the centers for distinct populations.

The first onsite public meeting will be Wednesday, September 27 at the current Deseret Industries at 131 East 700 South.  The proposed center will replace the thrift store and will serve women with 200 beds.  The current design calls for a ground floor with the emergency beds, a courtyard, dining area, beauty salon, kitchen, donation room, client services offices, clinical exam room, large hygiene room with showers and small retail area.  The second floor would house a break room, conference room, offices and a computer workstation area.

On Thursday, September 28 the city will hold a public meeting at the 275 West High Avenue site. That site will house a mix of men and women.  The ground floor would have the same amenities as the 700 South center but with 160 beds for men.  An additional 40 beds reserved for women will be on the second floor and similar second-floor amenities as the 700 South center.

Both centers were designed by AJC Architects and will be built to energy efficient standards.

A third center is planned for South Salt Lake City on the 3300 South block of 1000 West.  That center will serve only men and will provide 300 emergency beds.

The proposed homeless resource centers are part of what the city refers to as the “scattered site” model moves away from the concentrated services model that brought most of the services to the Rio Grande area.  The city argues that by breaking up the population currently being served in Salt Lake City, the city can better support the needs of specific populations and avoid the clustering of vulnerable populations.

Ground floor plan for the proposed 700 South Homeless Resource Center. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.
The second-floor plan for the proposed 700 South Homeless Resource Center. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.
Ground floor plan for the proposed High Avenue Homeless Resource Center. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.
The second-floor plan for the proposed High Avenue Homeless Resource Center. Image courtesy Salt Lake City public documents.

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