Developer plans mixed-use project for former Bicycle Center site

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Rendering of the Brixton Flats as designed by Blackbox Design architects. Image courtesy dbURBAN Communities.
Rendering of the Brixton Flats as designed by Blackbox Design architects. Image courtesy dbURBAN Communities.

In the nearly four years since the S-Line began service, most of the development spurred by the streetcar and greenway have been clustered at the east and west ends of the two-mile route in Sugar House and South Salt Lake.   But that is changing as more residential development is emerging around the line’s 700 600 and 700 East corridor.

Developer Baron Equities in conjunction with dbURBAN Communities plans to start construction soon on the Brixton Flats, a proposed five-story mixed-use development.  The project will replace the previous home of the Bicycle Center, which temporarily moved to the former Deseret Industries on Sugarmont Drive in Sugar House and will be part of the new development.

The project will 93 residential units in two buildings that will be connecting by a bridge with three floors of residential units above it.  The larger building will front both Wilmington Avenue and the S-Line Greenway and will include four floors of wood-framed residential above a ground floor parking podium.  The podium level will include structured parking, two residential units, office space fronting the S-Line Greenway and residential amenities including a fitness center and lounge area.  The southeast corner of the larger building will have an outdoor courtyard on the second floor above the podium.  The projects main entrance will front Wilmington Avenue.  A smaller entrance will front the S-Line.  To engage with the S-Line, the project will have the office and two residential units open directly to the greenway and streetcar line.

The smaller building will front 700 East will include two levels of retail including the return of the Bicycle Center that will be the anchor retail tenant.  Three floors of residential space will sit above the retail portion that will have its street-level entrance fronting 700 East.

In addition to the residential bridge, a plaza and small surface parking lot will separate the two buildings. The plaza will connect to the S-Line Greenway.

The development will replace three structures on 0.77 acres and is directly east of another large residential development underway, the under-construction Liberty Place townhome development by Cowboy Partners.  Framing is underway on the 70-unit townhome project on the 600 East block of Wilmington Avenue directly north of the S-Line.  The project includes eight buildings with 61 two-bedroom units and nine one-bedroom units.  Like the Brixton Flats, Liberty Place will engage with the S-Line with some units and amenities fronting the greenway.

Both projects are in the recently adopted, Form-Based Code zone as part of the Sugar House Streetcar Corridor Master Plan.  The Brixton Flats site is in the FB-SC (Special Purpose Corridor Core Subdistrict) zone which allows for building heights up to 60 feet (about five stories).  The Liberty Place development is in FB-SE (Special Purpose Corridor Edge Subdistrict) zone allows for building heights up to 45 feet.

Developers for the Brixton Flats plan to start demolition work in the next few weeks with construction expected to be completed by summer 2019.

Rendering of the south face of the Brixton Flats facing the S-Line. Image courtesy dbURBAN Communities.
Fences are up to make way for demolition of the former home of the Bicycle Center. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
Framing has started on the Liberty Place townhomes as seen from 600 East and the S-Line. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
About Isaac Riddle 630 Articles

Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for
Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.

  • Soren Simonsen

    Great to see this work underway on the S-Line.

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