In Pictures: Framing has begun on Sugar House townhomes

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Rendering of the under construction-townhomes adjacent to the S-Line and 800 East.

The Sugar House neighborhood is at the center of city tensions between urban growth and the status quo.  As demand increases for more urban offerings in popular neighborhoods like Sugar House, so does the resistance to change from long-time residents.

While significant mid-rise projects have recently opened in the heart of Sugar House’s commercial business district, higher-density projects outside of the neighborhood’s core have been met with resistance from neighbors.

Just blocks from the neighborhood’s core, construction is underway on two different townhome developments.  Both developments add the type of density that is more digestible to urban expansion-weary residents.

Sego Homes, known for building energy-efficient townhomes in Daybreak, is constructing four attached single-family townhomes along the S-Line streetcar and greenway near 2200 South and 800 East.  The townhomes are designed to directly engage with the S-Line greenway.

Construction is also underway on the 24 and 9 development consisting of three attached single-family townhomes at 2442 South and 900 East.

Both projects are being built on what was previously single family lots and are within walking distance to the S-Line streetcar.  The townhomes in both projects will each be three-stories tall.

Current trends in housing show that more and more people want an urban lifestyle with accessible mass transit, walkable communities and higher density housing.  Popular neighborhoods like Sugar House will be the first places to reflect these new housing trends.  Projects like these townhome developments help neighbors better acclimate to a changing neighborhood.

S-Line townhomes:

The first floor of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S Line Greenway near 800 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The first floor of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S-Line Greenway near 800 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S Line Greenway near 800 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S-Line Greenway near 800 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The west corner of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S Line Greenway near 800 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The west corner of the townhomes on the S-Line as seen from the S Line Greenway near 800 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The east corner of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S Line Greenway near 800 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The east corner of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from the S-Line Greenway near 800 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The first floor of the townhomes on the S Line as seen from 800 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The first floor of the townhomes on the S-Line as seen from 800 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.

24 and 9 townhomes:

The north side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The north side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The 900 East-facing side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The 900 East-facing side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The south side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East.  Photo by Isaac Riddle.
The south side of the 24 and 9 townhomes as seen from 900 East. Photo by Isaac Riddle.
About Isaac Riddle 613 Articles

Isaac Riddle grew up just outside of Salt Lake City, Utah. He has a BA in English literature from the University of Utah and a Masters of Journalism from Temple University. Isaac has written for
Next City, The Philadelphia Public School Notebook and Salt Lake City Weekly. Before embarking on a career in journalism, Isaac taught High School English in the Kensington neighborhood of Philadelphia. Isaac is the founder of Building Salt Lake and can be reached at isaac@buildingsaltlake.com.

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